How To Share A Small Space With Your Significant Other Without Breaking Up

Photographed by Erica Gannett.
Moving in with your significant other comes with a host of benefits. Suddenly, you have someone to split the chores with, someone to cook for (or if you're lucky, be cooked for by!), and maybe even someone to kill the bugs you're too afraid to squash. Plus, it kind of feels like you're at a sleepover all the time, except since you're not eight anymore, you can stay up as late as you want without having to whisper. Adulthood: It has its benefits!
But if you're the kind of person who craves a lot of alone time or who is particular about their stuff and their physical space, it can present some challenges. And that goes double if you're sharing a relatively small flat, home, or just a bedroom. "Coexisting in the same space can be psychologically challenging, especially if you’ve been use to having your own place. We like our stuff, we like them to be organised a certain way, we have systems and structure. When our stuff is touched, moved and our system messed with, it could feel like an invasion," cautions Dr. Kathrine Bejanyan, a dating and relationship consultant.
It's easy to feel like you're going to scream — or maybe swear off romantic relationships forever — if you have to observe your special someone's receipt collection littered across the table one more time. Or, you know, whatever your pet peeve is. But there are ways to get by, and even strengthen your relationship, in small spaces. Read on for expert-sourced tips that will ensure what you thought would be a sweet little home doesn't morph into the ultimate couple killer.

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