7 Genius Packing Tips — From A Pro Who Knows

Regardless of destination or occasion, travel promises an exciting break from our predictable daily grinds. But no trip, big or small, can begin without the dreaded packing dilemma. Because it's all fun and games until we're forced to decide what to pack, where to pack it, and whether or not we want to check or carry-on. Sure, checking luggage is less restrictive and allows for extra storage room, but it also opens us up to a host of potential setbacks like losing, waiting on, and lugging around that massively overpacked suitcase. Although carrying-on seems like the more efficient route, we're still far from mastering the art of packing light.
So we turned to Jen Rubio, cofounder and chief brand officer of Away, for help, hoping her professional luggage wisdom might save us from yet another packing mishap this summer. Rubio, it should be noted, vehemently supports the carry-on lifestyle, which she argues is a simpler and less stressful mode of travel. "You won’t have to worry about rolling multiple bags through an airport or different cities, and you can be a lot more flexible if you don’t have checked bags — if you’re early you can standby for an earlier departure, and if you’re running late you don’t have to worry about missing the baggage cutoff time," she tells Refinery29.
Ahead is Rubio's guide to carrying-on, in which she covers everything from packing essentials to the stuff we're better off leaving at home. It's officially time to steer clear of future suitcase struggles and sail smoothly into an effortless life of traveling light.

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