Princess Eugenie Can't Sparkle Like Meghan Markle Thanks To This Royal Rule

Photo: Jonathan Brady - WPA Pool/Getty Images.
Twinkle twinkle little tiar-a. How I wonder where you are-a?
Princesses Eugenie and Beatrice may have been born princesses, but the world’s favourite royal-by-marriage celebrities Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle have them beat when it comes to one regal perk: tiaras. Though the royal cousins to Harry and William love outlandish headgear, the don’t don the sparkly accessories coveted by Disney fans everywhere. The reason? Royal protocol dictates that royal family members hold off on wearing tiaras until they’re married.
Royal expert Geoffrey Munn explained the history behind the tiara to Irish website Her, saying, “The tiara has its roots in classical antiquity and was seen as an emblem of the loss of innocence to the crowning of love.” Get it? Crowning of love. Crowns and tiaras? Ok, you get it. But that wordplay is basically the only thing keeping the princesses from their diamond destinies.
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Luckily, Princess Eugenie’s days of parading around like a total peasant with zero diamonds on her head are almost over. She’s set to wed fiancé Jack Brooksbank in October, so she can finally shine like the pretty pretty princess she is (and also start sharing a life with the man she loves, or whatever).
Meghan Markle made her crowning debut at her wedding where she borrowed a nearly 100-year-old tiara from Queen Elizabeth’s private collection.
If you need me I’ll be out here kissing frogs, hoping one of them turns into Prince Harry Winston.
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