The Secret To Beyoncé's Glow On The Cover Of Vogue

Tyler Mitchell/Vogue
Beyoncé is always glowing, but in the September issue of Vogue, she took it up about 100 notches. Despite wearing very minimal makeup for the shoot, she appeared to be magically lit from within, looking like a goddess who's been drinking from the fountain of youth since day one.
So, of course, we wanted to know everything about her makeup — and whether that luminosity was just the new glow of motherhood, a gift from the Illuminati, or something we can actually pick up at Sephora.
“She’s all about being confident in your skin and owning your natural element," Sir John, Beyoncé's longtime makeup artist who worked with her on the Vogue shoot, said in a press release. "This look was all about redefining glamorous as a state of mind. We focused on enhancing her natural brows, skin and structure — and bringing out that inner glow."
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For the biggest superstar in the world, that doesn't take nearly as many products as you might expect.
First, John prepped her face with Marc Jacobs' Under(cover) Perfecting Coconut Face Primer, and then mixed a foundation that was slightly darker than Bey's natural complexion with Marc Jacobs' Dew Drops Coconut Gel Highlighter in Fantasy before tapping it along the high points of her face.
John insists the drops are "worth their weight in gold," but if you don't have £32 to spare, there's another radiant skin trick that's completely free: Sweep the mixture onto a wet face. "It's the best way to lock in your glow," he says. We think being Beyoncé also helps.
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