How Sex With A 'Micropenis' Can Actually Be Really Pleasurable

Photo: Megan Madden
Anyone who's had sex with penises of varying sizes will have an opinion on the age-old question: does size matter? There's no objective answer to this, of course, as we all have different preferences in the bedroom. But one thing's for certain: for men with a micropenis, the social stigma can be agonising.
A micropenis is one that's under 2.75 inches (about 7cm) when stretched and while they're relatively rare – just 0.6% of the world's male population reportedly has one – it can have devastating consequences on an individual's self esteem and sexual relationships.
But, according to one sex therapist, having a micropenis by no means spells a lifetime of unfulfilling sex for those involved. In fact, for many of her clients, a small penis simply means shifting the focus away from penetrative sex and onto other forms of pleasure (which, as many women will attest, could mean a much better time).
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"So much of what keeps people down, makes them feel awful, are these ideas about what good sex is, and it's a box, a very, very small box," Elizabeth McGrath, a somatic sex therapist in the San Francisco Bay Area, told the Daily Dot. "For somebody with a micropenis or their partner, not fitting in that box is very painful."
So, what's the solution? "There's humping, there's grinding, there's rubbing the penis on the labia or on the side, and then it expands into 'What kind of fun things can we do together?'" McGrath continued.
She also recommends considering acts that many consider foreplay, like oral sex, as equivalent to penetrative sex, and using sex toys, such as rings, vibrators and even "extenders" which can be worn over the penis. “I think any augmenting toys can be fun. But more importantly, is it comfortable and does it feel good? Are you doing it because you enjoy it or is it because you feel like it makes you more normal?”
McGrath works hard to reiterate to clients with micropenises that "normal" doesn't exist when it comes to sex and so they shouldn't have to "warn" partners. They shouldn't be ashamed and should instead focus on how they can touch their partner. “If they want to be physical with the person, then the best reaction is, ‘I would like to know how to touch you'," she added. As long as both parties are enjoying themselves, how could anyone object to that?
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