People Are Not Happy About This Makeup Artist's Hurricane Irma-Inspired Look

If there's any major takeaway from the countless works of eyelid art floating around the internet, it's that you can find eye makeup inspiration in just about everything. Taco Bell! That's So Raven! Chance the Rapper! Van Gogh's Starry Night! And what with all the acceptable things in the world that one can possibly base their makeup on, ripe and ready for the taking, you'd think that deadly natural disasters wouldn't even come into question. But you'd be wrong.
Because this week, makeup artist Kali Harlow shared her latest eye makeup look — and it was inspired by Hurricane Irma.
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"Remember in the eye of the storm, God remains in control," Harlow wrote on Twitter alongside two photos: one of her eye makeup, and one of the colourful satellite image of the storm that it was based on. This, as you can imagine, did not go over well, with hundreds of commenters remarking on the insensitive nature of the look. "It's a good look, just really bad timing," one said. "Like, people are dying and scared." True, and also true.
Harlow defended her decision to post the images at first, writing, "Y'all are literally taking my look and twisting it in a way I never thought possible." But when the backlash continued, she eventually apologised for her mistake.
Was Harlow's "inspiration" questionable? Well, of course. But is she really harming anyone by broadcasting her ill-advised choice on the internet? Nah. Consider saving the harsh Twitter takedowns for the people who are doing real damage, like the climate-change deniers trying to defund the EPA.

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