You Need To Read Demi Lovato & John Mayer’s Unfiltered Twitter Exchange

Photo: JB Lacroix/WireImage/Getty Images
Demi Lovato and John Mayer are united against bigotry.
Following the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, VA, where hundreds of alt-right protesters marched on the University of Virginia's campus to chant messages like "blood and soil" and "we will not be replaced," plenty of celebrities have come out to take a stand against hateful, racist, and xenophobic rhetoric, even if it might mean losing fans.
Advertisement
"I'd rather lose fans and stand up for what I believe in rather than be a bystander. #sorrynotfuckingsorry," Lovato wrote on Twitter, quoting her new single.
Mayer wrote back, agreeing with the "Skyscraper" songstress that now was not the time to be silent:
"This is the perfect time to remind everyone that speaking out against hate and bigotry should be the LEAST CONTROVERSIAL stance ever," wrote the singer.
Advertisement
Meyer wasn't the only famous fan to tweet his support for Lovato's comment. Zedd wholeheartedly agreed with the sentiment, simply writing "THIS!!!!!!!!!" in response to her original tweet.
While most people appreciated Mayer's response to Lovato's tweet, some commenters reminded the "Your Body Is A Wonderland" singer that he once made some not-so-great remarks regarding dating women of colour to Playboy in 2010. In the interview, Mayer stated that he wasn't as sexually attracted to Black women because his "dick is sort of like a white supremacist," later comparing it to David Duke, the former Imperial Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan.
The comments, rightfully, received plenty of backlash — and fans called Mayer out for it.
"This the perfect time to remind everyone what you said," wrote one Twitter user in response to Mayer's anti-bigotry stance.
Advertisement
Mayer is trying to be better in the present by condemning those practicing hate, and, like Lovato, should be applauded for that. However, no matter how well-intentioned he is now, his past comments are a reminder that we need to start being mindful of the ways in which our rhetoric can add to a dangerous culture of bigotry.
Advertisement