This French Fitness Instagrammer Just Made A Powerful Point About Body Image

Body positivity and self love – no, not that kind – are all the rage among a subset of Instagrammers at the moment. They're the ones opening up about the "flaws" that ensure they don't conform to society's impossible beauty standards. The trend is obviously great news for all of us – the more varied and unedited bodies we see represented, the easier it is to silence our own self-critical internal monologues once and for all.
But, for many of us, maintaining a positive body image is easier said than done. It's just not realistic to love everything about ourselves at every moment of the day. So, we're grateful for one fitness Instagrammer's reassurance that we're not letting the side down with our niggling negative thoughts.
Advertisement

⚡️ I am guilty. I am here to always be completely honest, because I feel social medias need more of it. | As much as I preach self love and truly made some progress accepting myself, there is something I really struggle with : pictures 👀 Whenever I see a picture of me, the first things which catches my eyes are my FLAWS. I always see what is wrong. "Too close". "My nose appears too big." "My legs look too white". "I look terrible" This is usually what follows when someone show me a picture they took of me 🤔 YET, I really do not look at people's flaws first when I look at a picture of someone else ! On the contrary, I tend to focus on their assets ❗️So why not do the same with yourself ? We really need to learn not to be so harsh on ourselves. It is not healthy. I am going to work on it, and I hope you will too. 💛 _____________________________________ ⚡️ Je plaide coupable. Vous savez que l'honnêteté est une valeur que je chérie; et je trouve que ca manque sur les réseaux sociaux. | Malgré que je prêche l'acceptance et l'amour de soi et que j'ai fait de réels progrès sur le sujet, il y a quelque chose avec lequel j'ai toujours beaucoup de mal : les photos 👀 A chaque fois que je vois une photo de moi, tout ce que je vois en premier sont mes défauts. Je vois toujours ce qui ne va PAS. "Trop proche" "Mon nez paraît trop gros" "J'ai l'air trop blanche" "Supprime" : ce sont généralement mes premières réactions après avoir vu une photo de moi 🤔 Pourtant, ce n'est pas du tout comme ça que je réagis quand je vois une photo de quelqu'un d'autre ! Au contraire, j'ai plutôt tendance à voir leurs atouts ❗️Alors pourquoi je l'applique-t-on pas à nous-même ? On doit vraiment apprendre à ne pas être aussi dur envers soi-même. Ce n'est pas sain. Je vais travailler dessus, et j'espère que vous aussi. 💛

A post shared by Louise| PARIS |Thinker & Maker (@mybetter_self) on

Louise Aubery recently shared a split-image photo with her 50k followers to highlight the stark disconnect between how others see us and how we see ourselves, and remind them to "not be so harsh" on themselves.
The post shows two identical images of the Parisian science student, with arrows pointing out the difference between how others see her and her own body image. In the first, she emphasises her "big nose", "back fat" and "cellulite", while in the second she focuses on her "big smile", "long legs" and "strong butt".
"I am here to always be completely honest, because I feel social medias need more of it," she wrote in the accompanying caption. "As much as I preach self love and truly made some progress accepting myself, there is something I really struggle with: pictures. Whenever I see a picture of me, the first things which catches my eyes are my FLAWS.
"I always see what is wrong. 'Too close.' 'My nose appears too big.' 'My legs look too white.' 'I look terrible," Aubery continued. Yet, when she looks at pictures of other people, their flaws are by no means the first thing that spring to mind.
Advertisement
"On the contrary, I tend to focus on their assets. So why not do the same with yourself? We really need to learn not to be so harsh on ourselves. It is not healthy. I am going to work on it, and I hope you will too," she added.
The post has received more than 8,000 likes at the time of writing, with many commenters praising Aubery for her candour and saying they regularly have similar thoughts. "I totally saw ALL your assets when I glanced at this pic, but then when you started using all the negatives about yourself, I was like 'That's exactly what I do when I look at pics of myself,'" one wrote. "Thanks for the lesson in self-love!"
Aubery has preached similar messages of body positivity in previous posts on her Instagram account, @mybetter_self, with one of her key points being that self love must come from a place of self acceptance.

🌈 I used to be terrible at self love. First, because I felt like I was not good enough / pretty enough / confident enough. Second, because I actually did not like confidence. Or rather, confident people. How could someone actually feels so good about oneself ?! Wasn't there something he / she could improve ? How could he / she be satisfied with what it had ?? It must have been narcissism 🌞 Breaking news : its not. Well, some, probably. But loving yourself actually comes from ACCEPTING yourself. You are incredible YOUR WAY. And that does not mean you can not improve ! You can. But to do so, acceptance & self love must come first. Because these will support you whenever you feel down. It will prevent you from despair, wishing you were different, giving it up 💃🏼 I have one little thing to ask you : practice self love every morning right when you make up. Just think to yourself : I am enough. And repeat it every morning. It will makes it way ❤️ _____________________________________ 🌈 J'ai toujours eu beaucoup de mal avec la confiance en soi. D'abord, parce que j'ai toujours pensé que je n'étais pas assez bien / assez jolie / assez confiante. Et deuxièmement, parce que je n'aimais en fait pas la confiance en soi. Ou plutôt, les gens qui avaient confiance en eux. Sérieux, comment pouvait-on être aussi content de soi-même ?? N'y avait-il pas quelque chose qu'ils pouvaient améliorer ? Comment pouvait-ils être si satisfait de ce qu'ils avaient ? Ca devait forcément être du narcissisme 🌞 Et pourtant : ça ne l'est pas. Enfin, pour certains, surement lol. Mais S'AIMER, et oui il faut oser dire le mot, viens en fait tout simplement par S'ACCEPTER. Car vous êtes incroyable à votre façon. Et ca ne signifie pas que vous ne pouvez pas progresser ! Vous pouvez. Mais grâce à cette acceptation, vous pourrez tenir dans les moments plus difficiles, quand vous recommencer à vous comparer, ou à vouloir abandonner 💃🏼 J'ai juste une petite chose à vous demander : demain, réveillez vous, et pensez très fort : Je suis à la hauteur. Et répétez-le le matin d'après. Ca fera son chemin ❤️

A post shared by Louise| PARIS |Thinker & Maker (@mybetter_self) on

Positive body image is all about readjusting our thought processes over time, she told Metro.co.uk: "The mind is what can help us most. We underestimate our ability to send it signals and influence our behaviour. It can’t happen in one day and it all comes down to practice: waking up telling you three things you are grateful for today, stating one thing you like about yourself every time you caught yourself despising something, and actually talking about it with like minded people and engage with positive influencers on Instagram."
"But you’ve got to be willing to work on it! It is primordial to overall happiness," she continued. What better time to inject some self love into our own thinking than the present?
Advertisement