The BBC Had To Apologise After Orlando Bloom Used This Offensive Word

Photo: Joanne Davidson/SilverHub/REX/Shutterstock.
Orlando Bloom is in hot water after repeatedly using a tone deaf term on air during a radio interview with BBC 1. The actor, who was interviewed by Nick Grimshaw on Tuesday, used a term considered offensive to people who are Travellers and Gypsies when talking about his upcoming movie, Unlocked. Following the interview, Grimshaw, Bloom, and a spokesperson for the BBC apologised for any offence the 40-year-old's comments may have caused.
The incident in question occurred after Grimshaw asked Bloom if he did his own stunts.
Advertisement
"I'm still a pikey from Kent, boy. I'm still a pikey from Kent," he replied. "You don't want to get on the wrong side of me, boy."
In an official statement, the BBC apologised for Bloom's use of the term, which is considered derogatory towards Travellers and Gypsies.
"As with any live broadcast, we take great care to ensure all guests are briefed about their language before going on air," a BBC 1 spokesperson said in a statement. "We apologised to listeners afterwards for any offence caused."
The initial apology came from Grimshaw who, after the interview, addressed the viewers directly.
"So good to have Orlando Bloom on the show... he's a bit of a loose cannon," Grimshaw explained. "Apologies if you were offended by anything that Orlando may have said."
Advertisement
Orlando later clarified his remarks, saying he didn't mean any disrespect when he used the term.
"I've come from Kent and I grew up with a lot of, like, freewheeling, cool, interesting characters like that," he explained. "I certainly wasn't taking a slant at that at all. I'm very respectful."
According to Marie Claire, fans found his use of the word particularly tone deaf since the company had recently aired a programme explaining exactly why the term was offensive — sounds like Bloom missed it. Hopefully, the star will take the time to re-educate himself on the term and be more thoughtful with his words in the future.
Advertisement