Why Women Are Marching In London This Saturday

Photo: NIKLAS HALLE'N/AFP/Getty Images.
As soon as it was confirmed last November that Donald Trump was to be the 45th president of the United States, women across America began mobilising.

Now, the Women’s March on Washington, which takes place this Saturday, the day after Trump’s inauguration, is expected to attract thousands of attendees, all concerned following a campaign for office that saw the future president, among other things, boast about sexual assault, threaten to reduce access to abortion, and employ misogynistic rhetoric.

What originated as a private Facebook group started by a Hawaiian grandmother, devastated by the election result, calling on 40 friends to march to Washington D.C. with her, is now a public event with 254,000 confirmed attendees on the social media site. Organisers have been quick to point out that the march isn’t so much anti-Trump as it is for women's rights. Their mission? To make the new administration understand that "women's rights are human rights."

"We’re excited to be together in solidarity and to send a strong message to our country that we are united as women," Carmen Perez, one of three national co-chairs of the event, told Refinery29.

And just as other cities across the United States are putting on their own marches in solidarity with Washington D.C., so too are other countries around the world, including London. In fact, there are currently due to be 616 'sister marches' around the world on Saturday.

As the U.K. organisers say: “We call on people of all genders to march in London as part of an international day of action in solidarity. We will march, wherever we march, for the protection of our fundamental rights and for the safeguarding of freedoms threatened by recent political events. We unite and stand together for the dignity and equality of all peoples, for the safety and health of our planet and for the strength of our vibrant and diverse communities.”

Thousands of women and men are expected to attend the march this Saturday. Women are finding myriad reasons for wanting to be involved.

Brita Fernandez Schmidt, Executive Director of Women for Women International, told Refinery29 UK:

"I am proud to join the Women’s March on London because I am passionate about equality and I believe we all – women and men – need to commit to equality. I will be attending alongside my colleagues and supporters of our work to highlight the experiences and realities of the women that Women for Women International supports in countries affected by conflict. I will be marching in honour of Amela, my first sponsor sister from Bosnia and Herzegovina. She told me in a letter “I’m so happy that you know I exist, and that you think of me.” These words inspire me every day. I want Amela’s voice to be represented in this global movement, so I will carry her name on my placard as I march.”

Whatever your reason for marching, Saturday is set to be a day to celebrate sisterhood, togetherness, as well as serving as a reminder that there is unfinished business. See you down there.

Everything you need to know about Women's March On London:

When is it taking place?
Saturday 21st January 2017.

What time?
12pm-3.30pm.

Where is it happening?
The march begins at the US Embassy, 24 Grosvenor Square, London, W1A 2LQ before moving on to Trafalgar Square.
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