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Lena Dunham Fronts Unretouched Lingerie Campaign

Photo: Courtesy of Lonely Girls Project.
They both stripped down to their smalls and were the epitome of body confidence in Girls. Now, Lena Dunham and Jemima Kirke are the new faces of a body positive lingerie brand.

In a photoshoot for New Zealand-based company Lonely, which never uses Photoshop in its campaigns, the writer and actress appears alongside her co-star in her underwear.

The photos are part of the company's Lonely Girls Project, a series of "candid portraits of inspiring women in their own spaces wearing Lonely, their way". The brand says it caters to "women who wear lingerie as a love letter to themselves".

In one of the photos, Lena casually reclines on the edge of a bath in an apartment in Brooklyn, New York, wearing seafoam green lingerie. Kirke sits beside her on a chair with her head on her hands, with her enviable IDGAF attitude, in a light blue lingerie set.

In another image, the pair wear black lingerie while Kirke puts red lipstick on Dunham.

The two women have long practiced what their preach when it comes to being comfortable in their own skin.

Dunham is reportedly a fan of the body positive brand and has worn its lingerie on Instagram in the past, the Daily Mail reported.

Queen Lena being the ultimate babe in her Lonely Bonnie Softcup set. We are so glad you exist @lenadunham #LonelyGirls

A photo posted by Lonely Lingerie (@lonelylingerie) on

She also caused a stir earlier this year when she mistakenly called out the Spanish magazine Tentaciones for photoshopping her body in a cover shoot. “This is NOT what my body has ever looked like or will ever look like,” Dunham said in an Instagram post. “The magazine has done more than the average photoshop”.

She was then forced to backtrack after the magazine released the original shots as proof that they hadn't used Photoshop. “I don’t recognise my own fucking body anymore,” she wrote in an essay for Lenny. “And that’s a problem.”

She then announced that she would never allow any subsequent images of her to be retouched. The Lonely campaign shows she's sticking to her word, and we can't be more grateful.