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George R.R. Martin Teases Possible Game Of Thrones TV Spinoffs

Courtesy of HBO: Macall B. Polay.
Though Game of Thrones may be coming to an end more quickly than we all expected, series author George R.R. Martin doesn’t think we need to abandon Westeros forever. Though David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, the showrunners of Game of Thrones, aren’t focused on a prequel or spinoff series, Martin thinks that it would be a natural progression.

“There is certainly no lack of material,” Martin tells EW. “Every episode of The Naked City – one of the television shows I watched as a kid – ended with a voice-over: ‘There are eight million stories in the naked city. This has been one of them.’ There are eight million stories in Westeros as well…and even more in Essos and the lands beyond. A whole world full of stories, waiting to be told…if indeed HBO is interested.”

Martin is right. Stories like Robert’s Rebellion or the Targaryen civil war, the “Dance of Dragons,” as it’s known, would each make for compelling, epic television. But Martin has a different direction in mind.

“The most natural follow-up would be an adaptation of my Dunk & Egg stories,” he tells EW.

Dunk & Egg, for the uninitiated, follows Ser Duncan the Tall, a hedge knight (one who doesn’t own land) and his squire, Egg. Egg later becomes better known as King Aegon V Targaryen of Westeros. So far there are only three novellas, which Martin suggests could be made into two-hour standalone movies. The tone of the novellas is much more comic than A Song of Ice and Fire, the series upon which Game of Thrones is based. Think of them like the Better Call Saul to ASoIaF’s Breaking Bad.

Martin says that he plans to write more Dunk & Egg stories, which would be nice. It would also be nice if he could finish the current book he’s working on. But who are we to complain? That would disrupt his busy schedule of saying semi-cryptic things in interviews.